Avian Aqua Miser: Automatic, poop-free chicken waterers

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Heated chicken waterer

Do you want an easy winter with no frozen chicken waterers to contend with? We give away plans for building your own heated chicken waterer here, but some folks always email to ask for a premade version. So we made a very limited run of premade heated waterers, offered them to our email-list subscribers first, and now have a grand total of two leftover for our blog readers.

If you want to nab one, here are the relevant stats:

  • 2 gallon volume with two nipples (sufficient for 34 chickens).
  • Comes with a lid with knob for easy removal. In addition, brackets within the bucket prevent your lid from falling in. (The knob may not look exactly like the one in the picture.)
  • In our tests, the nipples in these waterers freeze up in the low teens Fahrenheit.
  • Free shipping within the U.S. (We can't ship these out of the country at all --- sorry!). Shipping time is approximately 6 to 10 business days.
  • Cost: $100
Sold out!

Act fast if you want to be one of the last two lucky premade recipients this year! And if you want to join our email list so you're the first to hear about deals like this in the future, you can sign up using the form on the sidebar. Thanks for reading!

Posted mid-morning Friday, October 23rd, 2015 Tags:

Homestead inventorWe're on vacation this week, so I thought you might enjoy hearing from another chicken-related inventor. Jeremy Smith came up with a low-cost, dependable, premade automatic chicken coop door to protect his flock, then decided to share his invention with the world. I'll let him tell you more in his own words. --- Anna

In our quest to find a door that was reliable and safe to use in our own chicken's house, we came up very short.  There is simply not much available out there.  So, the master carpenter who works for me and I began designing our own coop door opener that would be trustworthy and that would cause our coop to be secure should we ever not be available to get the girls closed up at night.

After designing and building our door for our own coop, we realized that we had something that other people like yourself might find useful in keeping your own flock.  I know that our 28 Buff Orpingtons have been quite an investment in money, time and even care.  It took 6 months of feeding, safeguarding and caring for before we ever saw our first egg, so you can imagine our concern when we found cats, raccoons, coyotes, you name it trying to enter our chicken's coop.

Boxer chickenWho would have known that my family would have started keeping chickens much less be so concerned about their welfare?  My wife who hated the idea of keeping chickens at first would now be heartbroken if something got a hold of one of our girls.  If you have chickens, you know how much of a pet they can become. So we designed this Automatic Chicken Coop Door to help us protect our chickens but also give us our sanity back knowing that our chickens will be safe.

Since we created our own door we wanted to share it with all the other chicken owners out there so they could enjoy chickenkeeping without the constant worry for their flock's safety. To that end, we now offer a DIY version for $124.95 and a premade version for $184.99 to make predator prevention even easier for the busy homesteader. Because every chicken deserves a safe nighttime roost!

Posted Monday afternoon, September 28th, 2015 Tags:
kitten with cut chick

How long can a kitten and baby chick be friends?

I predict the Honeymoon will be over in about 9 to 10 weeks.

Image credit goes to Laura Hudson.

Posted early Tuesday morning, September 22nd, 2015 Tags:
chicks flying instead of ramp

Our new Red Ranger chicks are only 3 weeks old.

Instead of waiting for their ramp in the morning they fly down the 16 inch drop.

You can't get that kind of enthusiasm from Cornish Cross chicks.

Posted early Tuesday morning, September 15th, 2015 Tags:
chicken tunnel guy in front of wire tunnel section

When our chickens get into the garden they create a lot of damage.

Bruce Morgan in Australia uses an interesting system of tunnels to direct his chickens to a specific part of the garden for plowing and fertilization.

It looks like each section is 8 feet with a small wooden frame for support. This system seems like it would be more versatile than a regular chicken tractor and maybe easier for folks with uneven terrain.

Image credit goes to Youtube user Frank Gapinski.

Posted early Tuesday morning, September 8th, 2015 Tags:
Chicken Maker art collage

Check out Chicken Maker for a generous helping of fun and exciting Chicken Art!

There's hundreds of posts to choose from. Each one is original with an interesting description that sometimes borders on the fantastic side of poultry.

Posted early Tuesday morning, September 1st, 2015 Tags:
gigantic chicken church building

This beautiful Chicken Church is in the jungles of Indonesia.

Daniel Alamsjah had a divine message from God to build a church in the shape of a dove, but the end result looked more like a chicken.

I'm guessing a person could get a pretty good deal on the property...fix it up a bit and resurrect the building into a funky Bed and Breakfast business that celebrates all things Chicken related.

Image credit goes to thisiscolossal.com that has a nice video from the view of a drone flying around this majestic masterpiece.

Posted early Wednesday morning, August 26th, 2015 Tags:
metal chicken feed container update

We've been using a modified metal trash can to store chicken feed for 5 years.

That new trash can shine is gone, but the silicone seal at the handle continues to keep water out.

Posted at lunch time on Wednesday, August 19th, 2015 Tags:
duck with fake leg

One of our ducks had an injured foot that took two months to heal.

In the past few years 3D printing technolgy has been used to give a prosthectic leg to a rooster and a duck.

The surgery costs 2500 dollars, which is a little out of our league. Maybe the cost will go down when home 3D printers get better and cheaper.

Image credit goes to Terence Loring who created the 3D template.

Posted early Wednesday morning, August 12th, 2015 Tags:
coop made from old doors

The Sidell family wins our Ramshackled Coop contest.

They've since upgraded to a nicer coop made from an old out building.

The prize is an EZ Miser kit that makes it easy to convert almost any container into a side mounted chicken waterer.

Posted early Wednesday morning, August 5th, 2015 Tags:
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I just purchased your chicken nipples and bit, but I have a question since I'm new in the chicken world. Do chickens need direct sun almost all day to lay eggs or are they happy with a few hours in the morning and streams of sun through the trees. They are out in there pen from 8am until dusk.


Comment by suzanne roemer late Wednesday evening, July 27th, 2011

Especially in the summer, chickens will actually gravitate toward the shade. They do like to have some sunny spots for dust-bathing, and like more sun in the winter.

The longer the day length, the better your chickens will lay. But that doesn't mean they need to be in direct sunlight during that time, just that there needs to be enough light to keep them awake and active.

Comment by anna late Saturday afternoon, July 30th, 2011

My chickens go out of there way to try and find sources of the stuff, I have Styrofoam (polystyrene actually) insulating the outside of my package heat pump. They finally figured it out and have peck/eaten a large chuck out of one section, maybe 1 ft in diameter. They have found the stuff before, and they didn't seem to have any adverse affects, I try to keep them out of harms way. I assume they will be fine this time, and I have blocked them off from the area. but my question is, Should I eat the eggs? I have 2 buff orpingtons and a white silkie(the bad influence).They are known as betty white and the golden girls. the buffs had just started laying a few days ago. Any ideas?

Comment by David L at noon on Thursday, February 9th, 2012
I've heard from other people whose chickens go after styrofoam. I figure it can't be good for them, so I'd do my best to keep them away from it. As long as the chickens are healthy, though, I doubt it will affect the eggs, but I don't really know!
Comment by anna Thursday evening, February 9th, 2012
i have a week old chick that was doing fine until yesterday. Now he is not eating and just standing around or sleeping. I put him in a box by himself with a heating pad. I have been trying to get him to drink water with probiotics and electrolites. Does anyone have any suggestions?
Comment by Anonymous at teatime on Thursday, June 21st, 2012
Anonymous --- I'm so sorry to hear about your sick chick! Unfortunately, chicks sometimes just dwindle away, especially if they had some trauma in the egg or soon after hatching that didn't show up at the time. That said, solitary confinement in a warm place sometimes helps them bounce back, so it sounds like you're doing just the right thing.
Comment by anna early Sunday morning, June 24th, 2012
I cook for my chickens.I have four girls. in the morning they get laying food and cracked corn then I give then lettuce and bread they go gaga for it. in the afternoon they get a combo of rice flax seed sucker seed canned green beans. they don't get anything green in Michigan in the winter unless I give it to them. they never got the memo that they don't lay in the winter. their pen is protected and there is no snow in their pen i live my girls.i live in the city and have never had chickens before
Comment by Linda Monday night, March 25th, 2013
Linda --- Sounds like you've got happy chickens!
Comment by anna late Monday morning, April 1st, 2013

I was contemplating buying a hydroponic system for Fodder production (green forage) for my horses. With the rising, and unrelenting price of fuel to make the hay, hay has become very expensive ($5.50-7/bale)with NO end in sight. I wanted to be sure that my horses would eat this type of forage readily. I started to grow it in my DARK- no light available- cellar. Fodder can be grown without any light source, but it will be white and not green. I did, however, use a grow light for 2hrs/day. This made the fodder very green. It took a little bit of trial and error to get the water amount needed just right, but it worked. The animal consumes everything in the tray at the end of the week, seed casing, roots and all. There is no dirt, and the animals do LOVE it. Since fodder can be fed to ALL livestock, I fed to my ducks, chickens, and horses throughout the winter. basically as a treat, as I was only using seed starter trays, and my cellar isn't that big to have the number of trays I would need on a single layer all over my floor. ;) You need to soak untreated seed- Barley works the BEST! And, 85% of it is digestible, so they get a lot of good nutrition from the fodder, unlike hay which is 15% digestible. Protein levels of barley fodder equal that of corn, so you can save on feed! Steps- 1) soak seeds 15 minutes in 5 gallon bucket with 5% solution of bleach or peroxide:water ratio. You just need to make sure all the seed is covered. (you can use this solution to clean your trays after your seeds are soaked, so after the 1st day, don't throw it away. Literally, it takes only 10-15 minutes/day to maintain this feed source! 2) Rinse and fill up with only water- seeds need to soak 24hrs additional. 3) then drain again, after the 24hrs. 4) Place soaked seed inside your trays. 7lbs of DRY seed/day will fill a 12' long channel, and feed 4-6 horses and 100 chickens for the day. SO measure, and adjust the amount of seed you need, to account for how long your trays are and how many animals you need to feed. whether this is going to be your feed source, or if you are just giving them a treat. 50 for the 2nd day, I usually just use a spray bottle to water the seeds- enough to thoroughly soak them, but not enough for a lot of standing water. Then, spray every other day, put in 2cups water/tray every other day, starting on day 3. 5) Each day do a tray- with just enough for each days use. This gives you fresh fodder daily. Each tray takes 7 days to reach the right height. 6) Turn grow light on, if green fodder is wanted, for maximum of 2hrs/day. Materials needed: 5 gallon bucket; (2) 5 gallon buckets with lid are ideal! Spray bottle Water bleach or peroxide scrub brush to clean out trays before 1st use, and after every use to kill and inhibit fungi and mold growth 7 seed starter trays liquid cup measure SEED from seed distributor (online) and place to dry store seed. Garbage can with lid works great! Grow light bulb and brooder lamp works great! Spot where water run off/spillage won't damage property. I placed trays near our sump pump.

You can make your own feed, know what your chickens, ducks, and other animals are getting as a seed (you can be sure that there are no GMO's in your feed, and thus end up in your belly) And, they get fresh feed which they gobble up!

Comment by Heather Thursday afternoon, May 15th, 2014

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